The Conservation District is seeking to fill one vacancy on its Board of Supervisors.  Click here for more info.

Month of April

Ferry County Pride

Month - a celebration

of  Ferry County

natural resources.  (click for more info)

 

Month of April

Ferry County Pride

Month - a celebration

of  Ferry County

natural resources.  (click for more info)

 

 

On January 19,  presenters Whit Hibbard, Maurice and Beth Robinette and Tip Hudson shared their expertise with ranchers and  natural resource agency personnel from across Northeast Washington.  For more  details, read this Conservation Corner article.

Ferry Conservation District 

Co-Hosts Low Stress / Holistic Livestock Management Workshop

On January 19,  presenters Whit Hibbard, Maurice and Beth Robinette and Tip Hudson shared their expertise with ranchers and  natural resource agency personnel from across Northeast Washington.  For more  details, read this Conservation Corner article.

 

FY2018 Ferry Conservation District Annual Work Plan (7/1/17– 6/30/18)

 

 

September 26, 2016

 

Burn Bans Lifted

As of September 26, 2016, a ban on open fires in Ferry County has been lifted. As of October 1, 2016, the Washington Department of Natural Resources has lifted its burn ban. There is presently no restriction on burning in the Colville National Forest.

The 2018 wildfire season is over.  Most burn bans have been lifted throughoutthe state.  Campfires and firewood cutting are now allowed again on most public lands.   (click for more info on the current status of burn bans and firewood cutting.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liz Carr, Water Quality Specialist

 

liz.carr@conservewa.net

(509)775-3473 ext 105 

 

 

Liz is the newest member of the Conservation District team. She joined us in January, 2016. Liz is our water quality specialist. She will be working on water quality improvement projects throughout the District. Liz has a Bachelor of Science in Marine Ecology and a Masters in Environmental Studies from The Evergreen State College. She has an extensive and diverse background in environmental monitoring, public outreach and education. Her presence on our team is a huge plus for us and for our public.

Liz is the newest member of the Conservation District team. She joined us in January, 2016. Liz is our water quality specialist. She will be working on water quality improvement projects throughout the District. Liz has a Bachelor of Science in Marine Ecology and a Masters in Environmental Studies from The Evergreen State College. She has an extensive and diverse background in environmental monitoring, public outreach and education. Her presence on our team is a huge plus for us and for our public.

 

ttp://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/5654/Statewide-Burn-Ban?bidId=

Service announces November 2 application deadline for the next cycle of EQIP grant funding.

(click to read more)

It’s Tick Season

 

The weather has warmed and the snow is mostly gone except on the highest peaks.   It’s the season to work in the yard, walk on the property, take the kids on a hike or a bike ride.  Unfortunately, we humans are not the only ones becoming more active as spring progresses.  The ticks are out, too, and boy, are they hungry!

 

The tick is a small arachnid, more closely related to a spider than an insect.  

(Click to continue reading...)

 

A series of 3  informational meetings are scheduled for public review of the final draft Work Plan.  They will be held at:

  • The Kettle River Grange in Barstow on Friday, May 4,

  • The Curlew Fire Hall on Monday, May 7

  • The Ferry County Commissioners' Office on Tuesday, May 8.

All three meetings are scheduled for 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM.

 

 

Protect Your Home from Wildfire

 

Smoke is in the air.  Even after record precipitation the last nine months, fire season has arrived again.  You can't stop fire season from coming, but you can take some measures to protect your home  from the devastating effects of wildfire. Though the funding cycle for the District's Firewise program has ended, we can help you reduce your risks. Click here to read an article about Firewise principles. 

The Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has addtional information on its website (http://www.dnr.wa.gov/firewise).  The DNR may also be able to provide cost-share funding for fuel reduction projects (https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/dnrcostshare).

 

 

 

Dave Hedrick, Member

Associate Supervisors

       Bowe Brown

       John Hamilton

       Carol Fugitt

 

The Ferry Conservation District is seeking candidates to fill an open Board of Supervisors seat.  Individuals interested is running for this elected volunteer position must file by February 27, 2019.  (Click here for entire announcement. Click here for a description of Supervisor responsibilities.)

Interested and qualified candidates for a seat on the Ferry Conservation District Board of Supervisors must register by February 27, 2019 at 4 pm. Contact District office in advance for election procedure.  Election will be held on March 27.  To read entire announcement, click here.

Wednesday, February 27, 4:00 PM

Filing Deadline Set for Supervisor Seat Election

Wednesday, March 27, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Election to Fill Board of Supervisors Seat to be Held.

 

A poll-Site election for a seat on the Ferry Conservation District Board pf Supervisors will be held at the District office, 84 East Delaware, Republic, WA.  To read entire announcement, click here.

Wednesday, March 27, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Election to Fill Board of Supervisors Seat to be Held.

 

A poll-Site election for a seat on the Ferry Conservation District Board pf Supervisors will be held at the District office, 84 East Delaware, Republic, WA.  To read entire announcement, click here.

Supervisor Election Cancelled

The Election scheduled for March 27, 2019 has been cancelled. Pursuant to WAC 135-110-370, no poll site, absentee balloting or mail balloting will be performed. The Ferry Conservation District Board of Supervisors hereby informs the voting public that the incumbent has been re-elected to the currently open seat by reason of being the only person filing for the position by the filing deadline of February 27, 2019.  For further information, please contact the District 509-775-3473.

 

Posted: February 28, 2019

Missed the deadline for the Plant Sale? Hurry! It's not too late.

Work Plan Approved by State Technical Panel!

On Friday, October 26, 2018, the State Technical Panel voted to approve the County VSP Plan (Click here to read the approved Work Plan).  On October 29, 2018, Mark Clark, the Executive Director of The Washington State Conservation Commission, formally approved the Plan (click here to read approval letter).

 

 

These were the steps leading to approval of the Work Plan:

  • Mon, July 16: Ferry County VSP Work Group motion (made and passed!) to submit Work Plan to State.

  • Fri, August 31: Ferry County VSP Work Plan Submitted to the State of Washington VSP Technical Panel for review.

  • Fri, September 28: Technical Panel first review

  • October 15, 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM:  VSP Work Group Meeting.  The Work Group reviewed the State Technical Panel comments on the Work Plan, submitted responses, and discussed next steps after the Work Plan is approved and when the Work Plan shifts into VSP implementation mode.

  • Fri, October 26: Technical Panel reviewed Plan and voted to approve it.

  • Mon, October 29: Formal approval of Plan by Executive Director of Washington State Conservation Commision.

Lloyd Odell - VSP Coordinator
lloyd.odell@conservewa.net
(509)775-3473 ext.104
 
Lloyd Odell - VSP Coordinator
lloyd.odell@conservewa.net
(509)775-3473 ext.104
 
Lloyd Odell - VSP Coordinator
lloyd.odell@conservewa.net
(509)775-3473 ext.104
 

Forest

Owners

Winter

School

A hands-on

interactive

educational 

event for families who own forestland in Washington. A variety of workshops and presentations will help you gain more benefits from your forest. For more information, click here.  Presented by WSU Extension/Forest Stewardship.

We have not canceled the Spring Plant Sale!  

New this year: Milkweed

 

Planting trees, shrubs and edibles on your property provides multiple benefits.  Plants will beautify your property and add to its value.  The foliage and fruits of plants provide food for wildlife and for your family... (click to continue reading...) 

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

               Managing Your                          Property for                              Native                                        Pollinators

 

Pollinators are animals, primarily insects, who move pollen from the male part of a plant (anther) to the female part of the plant (stigma) or another of the same species.  This service provided by the pollinator results in the production of seed and in turn aids in the propagation of that plant. (Click to continue reading...)

               Managing Your                          Property for                              Native                                        Pollinators

 

Pollinators are animals, primarily insects, who move pollen from the male part of a plant (anther) to the female part of the plant (stigma) or another of the same species.  This service provided by the pollinator results in the production of seed and in turn aids in the propagation of that plant. (Click to continue reading...)

               Managing Your                          Property for                              Native                                        Pollinators

 

Pollinators are animals, primarily insects, who move pollen from the male part of a plant (anther) to the female part of the plant (stigma) or another of the same species.  This service provided by the pollinator results in the production of seed and in turn aids in the propagation of that plant. (Click to continue reading...)

               Managing Your                          Property for                              Native                                        Pollinators

 

Pollinators are animals, primarily insects, who move pollen from the male part of a plant (anther) to the female part of the plant (stigma) or another of the same species.  This service provided by the pollinator results in the production of seed and in turn aids in the propagation of that plant. (Click to continue reading...)

WACD

2016 Conservation Awards

 

The Washington Association of Conservation Districts (WACD) will be presenting nine awards recognizing conservation districts, tribes and individuals for outstanding contributions to conservation at their annual meeting in November.    If you wish to nominate a person or entity who you believe deserves special recognition, read more here about the award categories and  and the nominating process.

Hunt Waterfowl by

Permission on District Property

Hunt Waterfowl by

Permission on District Property

 

Call (775-3473, ext. 100) or visit the Conservation District to obtain a  permit to hunt waterfowl on District properties on Roberta Lake or on the Kettle River in Danville.  Four individuals per day per property.  No hunting without a permit. For WDFW regulations, click here.

Ferry Conservation District

Seeks Manager

The  District is accepting applications for District Manager until January 11, 2019.  To apply for this position, contact Candy Lammon, the District's Office Manager at (509)-775-3473 ext 100, or by email at candy.lammon@conservewa.net. Click here for a detailed job announcement.  Click here for a detailed job description (find application instructions at the very end of the document). 

Missed the deadline for the Plant Sale? Hurry! It's not too late.

The original deadline for ordering plants has passed.  However, we still have plants left.  We have apple, crab apple and plum trees, honeyberry, strawberry,  and rhubarb plants, as well as serviceberry, oregon grape and paper birch.  Click here for information about plant availability and ordering.  Click here for general information about plants.

 

Posted: March 28, 2019

Firewise Workshop

Protect your home from wildfire.  Learn the basics of how to create defensible space around your home.  Firewise Specialist Guy Gifford from the Washington Department of Natural Resources will explain these important concepts. At the Ferry County Fairgrounds.

Ferry County

Conservation Fair

Learn about the natural resources of our county.  Enjoy educational workshops, booth, displays and live demos by contractors who work with local natural resources. Fun and informative for all ages. To be held at the Ferry County Fairgrounds.

Friday

12 April

2019

10 AM -4 PM

 

Saturday

13 April

2019

9 AM - 1 PM

Ferry County

Conservation Fair

Learn about the natural resources of our county.  Enjoy educational workshops, booth, displays and live demos by contractors who work with local natural resources. Fun and informative for all ages. To be held at the Ferry County Fairgrounds.

Protect Your Home from Wildfire

 

Smoke is in the air.  Even after record precipitation the last nine months, fire season has arrived again.  You can't stop fire season from coming, but you can take some measures to protect your home  from the devastating effects of wildfire. Though the funding cycle for the District's Firewise program has ended, we can help you reduce your risks. Click here to read an article about Firewise principles. 

The Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has addtional information on its website (http://www.dnr.wa.gov/firewise).  The DNR may also be able to provide cost-share funding for fuel reduction projects (https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/dnrcostshare).

 

 

Protect Your Home from Wildfire

 

Smoke is in the air.  Even after record precipitation the last nine months, fire season has arrived again.  You can't stop fire season from coming, but you can take some measures to protect your home  from the devastating effects of wildfire. Though the funding cycle for the District's Firewise program has ended, we can help you reduce your risks. Click here to read an article about Firewise principles. 

The Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has addtional information on its website (http://www.dnr.wa.gov/firewise).  The DNR may also be able to provide cost-share funding for fuel reduction projects (https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/dnrcostshare).

 

 

Meetings are open to the public and are held at

Meetings are open to the public and are held at

Ferry County Pride Month is Here!Our annual April celebration of Ferry County natural resources is underway. Festivities will include the Spring Conservation Fair (4/16) and the 2016 Plant Sale (4/15-16)  The Pride Guide is in local mailboxes now.  The Spring Conservation Fair flyer can be found here.

 

2016 Plant Sale NewsThough the initial deadline for ordering has passed, we still have limited quantities of the following plants available:Apples, Plums, Strawberry, Raspberry, and BlackberryTo order, please call  us (509-775-3473 X100), or email (candy.lammon@conservewa.net) . All plants must still be pre-ordered.  Pickup will be on April 15 & 16  Look here for a detailed description of plants offered this year (only apples, plums, and berries still available). Bring your extra garden seed for swapping and trading.  Bring a bucket and take home free mixed Terra-Sorb to protect your new plants and/or improve the water holding capacity of your soil.  Do you have plants from past Conservation District Plant Sales? We would love to feature them on this website.  Please email photos to bill.chamberlin@conservewa.net Washington Farm Forestry AssociationAnnual Winter Meeting8:00 - 4:00Saturday, Feb 20, 2016NE WA Fairgrounds Ag CenterSafeguarding Your Forest Land$20 ($10 child) Registration includes continental breakfast and lunch. Register before 2/5/16 for early bird prices.More info here (Follow links to full agenda and registration form)

 

 

 

Most people agree that conservation works best when people who live and work in an area learn to take care of their own natural resources. As legal sub-divisions of Washington State government, conservation districts are self-governed by a five-member volunteer board that establishes local priorities and sets policy. The Ferry Conservation District (FCD) Board is composed of local farmers, landowners, and concerned citizens and is dedicated to maintaining Ferry County's renewable natural resources. Its priorities and goals include:

  • Protection and improvement of surface and groundwater quality

  • Assisting good stewardship of Farm & Forest land 

  • Watershed planning and implementation

  • Riparian restoration and enhancement

  • Fish and wildlife habitat enhancement

  • Conservation education

These goals are met through FCDs extensive technical assistance and public outreach programs. FCD's volunteer board of supervisors guides and administers FCD's programs to provide education and on-the-ground assistance to our cooperators. FCD staff works with private partners, local, state and federal government agencies, agricultural and environmental organizations, and other conservation districts. The FCD is funded through grants, a special Island County assessment, an annual native plant sale, and state general fund money requiring a dollar-for-dollar match.

Annual Meeting

Ferry/Stevens/Pend USDA-NRCS Oreille Local Work Group

Thursday, November 19, 12:30-5:00 PM

USDA Service Center, 232 Williams Lake Rd., Colville, WA 

 

Purpose:  To set ranking priorities for 2017 Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP)

 

Meeting Agenda

Ferry County and theFerry Conservation District have published After a Wildfire: Resources for Ferry County Landowners. 

Monday, November 2, 5:00 PM

Special Meeting to review Job Description and Hiring Process for the Position of District Manager.  Also on the agenda: hunting access on Conservation District property. For more info, click here.

Women in Agriculture Conference
November 18, 2017
Watch  featured speakers on videoconference  at Ferry County / WSU Cooperative Extension Office, Republic.  Click here to receive updates and details on the conference.

 

 

 

 

 

Note:  While many of the following plants have been sold out,  we have and number of plants still available.  For info on what you can still order follow this link.

 

Ferry Conservation District to offer Natives, Ornamentals and Edibles

at 2015 Plant Sale

 

Planting trees, shrubs and berries on your property provides multiple benefits.  Plants will beautify your property and add to its value.  The foliage, fruits, and nuts of plants provide food for wildlife and for your family.  Flowering shrubs attract pollinators, such as butterflies and bees, enhancing the entire ecosystem.  Trees can provide shade or act as a windbreak.  Reforestation trees enhance the landscape and provide timber for harvest in the future.  Planting in riparian areas (river and stream banks) helps protect river and stream banks, preventing erosion and degradation of water quality. 

 

For its 2015 Spring Plant Sale, the Ferry Conservation District is offering a variety of plants carefully selected for use in our particular climate.  (Plants have been chosen which will thrive in Planting Zones 2-5.  Most of Ferry County is Zone 4 or 5).  Wholesale nurseries in Washington, Montana and Idaho supply healthy, hardy, planting stock grown in the Northwest.   By purchasing in bulk the District is able to provide excellent plants at good prices. 

 

Native trees and shrubs are an important part of the sale.  Why natives?  Natives are the plants naturally occurring in an area.  This means they are adapted to the local climate and soil conditions and need less irrigation and fertilization than non-native plants.  They are more resistant to pests and disease and will better provide food and shelter for native wildlife.

 

The Red-osier Dogwood (Cornus sericea) is a native deciduous shrub, valued aesthetically for its colorful winter stems.  Growing to 5’ to 15”, it has small white flowers and white berries, attractive to birds, bees and butterflies.  Native Americans made use of its berries, bark and branches.  This plant does well in full sun to partial shade and tolerates a range of soil conditions, preferring wet soils. Found naturally along streams and in marshy areas, it serves well as a planting to stabilize streambanks. 

 

The Woods’ Rose (Rosa woodsia) is a native deciduous shrub,
growing to 6 feet.  The pink flowers and red fruit (hips) attract birds, mammals and pollinators.  The hips, which were used by Native Americans, are a good source of vitamin C and can be made into jams and jellies.  This rose, named after botanist Joseph Woods, tolerates a variety of soil conditions, and prefers moderate to full sun.  It spreads by suckers, so it can be very aggressive in your landscape.

 

Mock Orange (Philadelphus lewisii) grows to 9 feet tall, with large clusters of fragrant white blossoms. Because of its fragrance (similar that of orange blossoms), consider planting near a walkway or driveway.  The nectar-rich blossoms of this native deciduous shrub will attract pollinators.  The mock orange will tolerate partial shade but may blossom more profusely in full sun.  Once established, it will tolerate dry soil conditions.

 

Blue Elderberry (Sambucus Cerulea) is a native tree/shrub which can grow to 12 feet or higher.  This deciduous plant produces creamy white blossoms which are followed by powder blue berries.  The highly edible berries can be made into wine, jam, or pie.  Birds love the elderberry, which provides opportunities for perching and nesting, as well as sustenance in the form of berries.  The flowers will attract pollinators and many mammals and birds will eat the fruit and leaves.  Elderberry prefers full sun, and likes moist conditions, though it will tolerate a drier site.

 

A smaller shrub, the native Snowberry (Symphoricarpos occidentalis) grows to between 1 ½ and 5 feet in height.  This plant has pale pink blooms, followed by greenish-white berries.  Though the berries are poisonous to humans, they are an important winter food source for birds.   Bees and butterflies are attracted to the snowberry flower’s nectart.  Snowberry likes moist, but well-drained soil and full sun.  Because it has vigorous and deep roots it is a good plant for bank stabilization. 

 

Another native shrub/tree, the Mountain Alder (Alnus incana) may grow as tall to15 feet or taller.  Also referred to as the speckled or grey alder, it is a nitrogen fixer.  Like beans and peas in your garden, it will actually pull nitrogen from the air and put it into the soil, thus improving the soil quality.  For this reason it can grow in poor soil.  The alder is generally a wetland plant, preferring moist soil, making it a good choice for streambank stabilization. Native Americans used the mountain alder wood for making a dye, for cooking and smoking meat and fish and for making baskets.

 

Our only native deciduous conifer, the Western Larch (Larix occidentalis) may grow to as tall as 150 to 200 feet, with a diameter of over 4 feet.  The needles of the larch (also known as tamarack) turn a beautiful golden color in October and drop off in November.  This tree prefers north-facing slopes, but is very shade intolerant.  It is more fire resistant then other native conifers and is prized as firewood.

 

This year we are offering Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) for reforestation.  The Ponderosa (reaching 50’-100’ and sometimes much taller) grows abundantly in our area on dry south-facing slopes and is very tolerant of high summer temperatures.    The thick orangey-brown fissured bark is covered with puzzle-shaped pieces and on a hot summer days smells of vanilla.  The Ponderosa Pine, a major source of timber in our region, also provides important wildlife habitat, recreational use, and aesthetic value.

 

The Ferry Conservation District is also offering one ornamental shrub and one ornamental conifer tree.

 

The Late Lilac (Syringa villosa) grows to a height of 6’ – 9’ and blooms after the traditional lilac with rosy-lilac to white colored blossoms.  It will add color and attract pollinators to your property.

 

The Colorado Blue Spruce (Piecea pungens) is a bluish-green conifer which may reach a height of 50 feet or more.  The distinctive color and generally even shape of this conical tree make it an attractive ornamental. Blue spruce trees thrive in full sun to partial shade and moist, well-drained soil.

 

This year, as in the past, a number of plants with edible fruit or nuts will be available.

 

If you are starting or adding to an orchard, consider the Wealthy Apple.     It is not a self-pollinator, so it must be planted in proximity to another variety of apple which blooms at approximately the same time.

   

For this reason, the Whitney Crab Apple has been included this year.  This self-pollinating apple does not need another apple tree near it, but it will pollinate other early blooming apples, including the Wealthy.    This golf ball-sized crab apple, able to thrive in planting zone 2 or 3, it will make excellent jam and jelly, and its firm, crisp, tangy-sweet, juicy flesh makes it a pretty good eating apple, too. 

 

 With its higher elevations and cold climate, Ferry County is a difficult place to grow peaches.  To meet this challenge, the Conservation District is offering the Reliance Peach this year.  Grown successfully where temperatures drop as low as 25 degrees below (F) zero, this excellent canner will produce fruit in most places in the county, without need for another pollinator.

 

The White Gold Cherry is a self-pollinating sweet cherry, adapted for very cold climates. It is also a very good pollinator for other sweet cherries.   A cross between the Emperor Francis and the Stella cherry, the White Gold has an attractive yellow-blushed-red color.

 

The peach and cherry varieties are full size (could grow to 20 ft tall).  The two apple trees are semi-dwarf varieties (50%-60% of full size).  The mature sizes of all of the fruit trees can be minimized by proper pruning.

 

For the 2015 Plant Sale the Conservation District is offering the English Walnut (Juglans regia carpathian).   This tree, which originated in Central Asia, may reach 75 feet or higher at maturity.  It will produce a rich-flavored nut with a relatively thin shell.

 

Two different strawberries are featured this year, a June-bearing variety and an everbearing one. 

    

The Shuksan Strawberry, developed at Washington State University in 1970, produces ripe berries for a three-week period in late June and early July.  These deeply red berries have a wonderfully sweet flavor.

 

For a long season of fresh strawberries, the Conservation District is again offering the Tristar Strawberry.  This delicious medium sized berry will produce from early July until the first killing frost in fall (some years into October.)

 

To order plants, look for a flyer in the mail soon or visit the Ferry Conservation District website at www.ferrycd.org.  Complete the form and mail it back to the Conservation District without payment by January 28, 2015.  Orders will be filled on a first come-first served basis.  Confirming invoices will be sent out detailing the plants ordered and the cost.  Most plants arrive as dormant, bare root stock.  Plants will be available for pick up at the Ferry County Fairgrounds on Friday, April 17 from 10am – 4pm and on Saturday, April 18, from 9am – 1pm.  If you have any questions regarding plant availability or what type of plant(s) would best suit your needs, please contact the District at 775-3473 (ext 100).

 

 

Low Stress Handling & Holistic Livestock Management Workshop

 

Tuesday,  January 19, 2016  9:00 am to 4:00 pm

K Diamond K Ranch, 15661 Hwy 21 South, Republic WA 99166

 

A series of presentations to address practices for low stress handling and holistic livestock management.

 

Presenters:

Whit Hibbard - Low stress livestock handling - Montana cattle and sheep rancher, publisher/editor of Stockmanship Journal

 

Maurice Robinette - Holistic Management - Lazy R Ranch and Pacific Northwest Center for Holistic Management

 

Tip Hudson - WSU Estension and team member of Pacific Northwest Center for Holistic Mangagement

 

Cost: $13 per attendee to cover lunch and facilities.  Please RSVP to lloyd.odell@conservewa.net, or call Ferry Conservation District, (509)775-3473 ext. 104.  Please register by January 14, 2016

 

For more info, including the event schedule, go here.

2019 Spring Plant Sale

Ferry Conservation

District Event to Offer

Natives, Fruit Trees,

Berries, Grapes and

Other Edibles

 

Planting trees, shrubs and berries on your property provides multiple benefits.  Plants will beautify your property and add to its value.  (Click to continue reading...)

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

USDA Offers Assistance to Farmers and Ranchers Affected by Fires

 

Financial assistance may  be available from the U.S Department of Agriculture's Farm Service Agency (FSA) for losses from last summer's devastating fires. Livestock producers may be eligible to receive financial compensation (up to 75% of fair market value) for fire-related loss of many kinds of commercial animals, including adult cattle, horses, sheep, alpacas, swine, goats, llamas, poultry and honeybees.  It is important that producers report losses within 30 days.

 

In addition, the government may provide financial assistance for loss of forage and pasture, whether on private or public land.

 

To report loss or if you have questions about this disaster assistance or your eligibility, contact Cliffene at the Ckanogan FSA office: (509)-422-2750.  For additional information, read the FSA press release.

 

Department of Agriculture Offers

Drought Relief to Ranchers

Recent extreme drought conditions have put a lot of stress on local livestock and their owners. In response to the dry conditions, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farms Service Agency (FSA) has activated several disaster relief programs. Ferry County livestock producers may be eligible for these programs. For more information, read our press release.

 

WHERE ARE THE FIRES?  

Though wildfire season is over in Northeast Washington, it is still dry in other parts of the West.

Check these websites for the latest wildfire news.

ESRI Disaster Response Program

NWCC - Northwest Coordination Center

INCIWEB - Incident Information Center

NEWS 

After the Fire: BAER Reports Released             Including New Soil Burn Maps

 

A Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) team, a group of technical specialists assigned by the US Forest Service to analyze post-fire conditions of burned watersheds, has recently released reports detailing stabilization and recovery plans for the North Star, the Stickpin, the Renner, and the Graves Fires.  The Interagency's Inciweb site has detailed maps of these fires  which illustrate the severity of the soil burn (not directly correlated to vegetation loss) and can be used to predict elevated risk of future debris flow events.  BAER has begun treatment of some burned drainages north of the Boulder/Deer Creek Rd. to reduce flooding hazards and protect drinking water sources.  The US Geological Service has published an informational document on Debris-Flow Hazards.  Photos of the post-fire recovery efforts can be viewed on the Inciweb site.

 

Some areas of the Colville National Forest (CNF) burned by the 2015 fires remain closed to the public due to hazardous conditions. The CNF website details these closures.

 

Additional Resources

The Natural Resources Conservation Service has put together an informational website with fact sheets and conservation practice suggestions for landowners impacted by fires. There are guidelines landowners can utilize to determine if scorched trees will live, examples of soil erosion prevention measures, and grass seeding suggestions.  NRCS is also accepting applications for financial assistance (until Feb. 19,2016) for agricultural producers who were impacted by wildfires in 2014 or 2015.

 

The Okanogan Conservation District has a website page 

dedicated to fire recovery resources. The University of Idaho extension  has published an excellent document, "After the Burn, Assessing and Managing your Forestland After a Fire."

The Ferry Conservation District Board of Supervisors Has Adopted a New Five Year Plan

After a period of public comment, the District's Board has adopted the new long range plan.  This plan states the mission and goals of the District as well as outlining specific programs that will be implemented to realize those goals.  

November Noxious Weed Workshop

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

1:00 to 4:00 p.m.

Ferry County Commissioner's Office

Sponsored by Ferry County Noxious Weed Control Board

 

Controlling Noxious Weeds After a Fire; Drought & Noxious WeedsTip Hudson, Associate Professor, WSU Kittitas County Extension

 

New Herbicide Products; EA Products vs. Other Surfactants; Noxious Grasses & Products fort ControlLori Jasman, Wilbur Ellis

 

Federal Programs Available to Assist Landowners After a FireLloyd Odell, Ferry Conservation District Manager; Patrice Beckwith, NRCS Resource Conservationist; Steve King, NRCS Farm Service Office

 

To register, call the Ferry County Weed Board (509) 775-5225 x1111

Water Quality Technician

Ferry Conservation District

announces new position

 

This position will manage and implement water quality and other monitoring projects.   A job announcement and detailed job description provide more detail.  Position open until filled.

Saturday

     Morning    In Republic, WA

           Live!

 

 

 

Avoiding Toxic

Relationships

                  ...With Plants!

 

Join Dr Patricia Talcott, WSU Professor of Veterinary Medecine for a dynamic presentation on toxic plants, pesticides and herbicides and their potential effects on livestock and pets. 

 

11:00 am, March 28, at the Eureka Gulch Community Playhouse, 75 N. Keller Street in Republic.

Beverages and light refreshments will be served.  Door prizes, too!

 

Coming up!

  • Protecting your home from wildfire,  4/18

  • Improving wildlife habitat and defensible space, 4/25

 

The Saturday Morning Live series is brought to you with support from the  Washington State Conservation Commision as part of the Ferry County Voluntary Stewardship Program.

Posted: January 15, 2020

Updated:  March 15, 2020

Meetings are open to the public and are held at

Be Prepared for Fire Season!  

Forest Fuel Reduction Assistance Available

 

Fortunately, most of Washington received a break from devastating  wildfires this past summer.  It is inevitable, however,  that there will be more summers  like 2014 and 2015.  

 

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Services (NRCS) and the Forest Service are offering technical and financial assistance to help small forest landowners in northeastern Washington treat excessive fuels on their forestland.  Forest treatment will also improve resistance to common disease and pest threats. Highest priority will be given to landowners in certain targeted areas.  

 

For information on DNR project funding, visit the DNR Forest Stewardship web page (Financial Assistance [cost-share]). Though the NRCS deadline for 2016 projects has passed, applications for 2017 projects are now available. For information on NRCS assistance, contact Patrice Beckwith, phone:(509)775-3473 ext 102, email: patrice.beckwith@wa.usda.gov 

 

The 2017 Spring Plant Sale is Over!

 

Natives, Ornamentals, Edibles and Reforestation Trees - We Sold Plants for Every Need

 

 

If you missed us this time, look for us next year.  Please let us know if there is a particular plant you would like (call 775-3473 ext 100).  We'll do our best to find it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We do have a few Shuksan Strawberries left.  This is a June-bearing plant, with large sweet berries.  Call 775-3473 (ext 100) if interested.

Coming Very Soon!

 

Low-Stress Livestock Handling Clinic

K Diamond K Guest Ranch and Gotham Ranch- Republic, WA

May 19-21, 2017

 

Workshop will feature instruction by Whit Hibbard, Hilary Zaraneck and Andrew Anderson, all full-time Montana ranchers.  

 

Low-stress livestock handling (LSLH) can improve rangeland health, increase animal production and  prevent conflicts with carnivores.  

 

For more information, click here.  

To check space availability, contact Jay Kehne,

509-470-1767,  jkehne@conservationnw.org

 

 Burn Bans / Chainsaw Restrictions Lifted

 

Now that the temperatures have cooled and precipitation (including snow) has fallen, burn bans in Ferry County have been lifted, and there are no longer restrictions on chainsaw use on public land (a permit is required to cut firewood on forest service land. Check with local ranger district office before cutting.) Below are links to various government entities regarding burning and chainsaw use to help make your outdoor work or recreation  go more smoothly: 

     What can I burn with or without a permit?

 

 

Restrictions on burning and cutting may differ for areas outside of Ferry County.  Please check with appropriate agencies for details.

       WSU Extension Forestry to            Offer  Workshop in February

     for Landowners          

 

Forest Owners Winter School

Sat. Feb 17, 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Colville WA 

This program is a hands-on interactive educational event for families who own forestland in Washington.  This a great opportunity to learn how to gain more benefits from your family forest. Click here to view a flyer for registration and more info.

 

Visit this  website for more info about WSU Extension Forestry programs.

At any time of the year, you may burn only natural vegetation. Without a permit, you may burn only one pile at a time (less than 10 feet across).   To avoid false alarms, notify the Ferry County Dispatch (775-3132) of your intentions to burn.  Burn bans may be in effect due to poor air quality, so be sure to call the Department of Natural Resources  (DNR) at 888-323-2876 or visit their website for updated air quality information.  Call DNR's Colville office (509-684-7474) for information on obtaining a permit for burning multiple larger fires.

Conservation District

Seeks Supervisor

One seat on the Ferry Conservation District Board of Supervisors is available for appointment by the Washington State Conservation Commission. Conservation district board supervisors are public officials who serve without compensation and set policy and direction for the conservation district. An applicant must be a registered voter in Washington State, and may be required to own land or operate a farm.  If you are interested in applying for this position,  click  here for more information. 

Posted: March 29, 2019

Updated: August 1, 2019

It’s Tick Season!It’s Tick Season!The weather has warmed and the snow is long-gone except on the highest peaks.   It’s the season to work in the yard, walk on the property, take the kids on a hike or a bike ride.  Unfortunately, we humans are not the only ones becoming more active as spring progresses.  The ticks are out, too, and boy, are they hungry!...(Click to continue reading...)

Saturday

March 28

11:00 AM- 12:30 PM

This event has been cancelled.

Saturday

     Morning    

           Live!

Professor Patricia Talcott  presents

Avoiding Toxic Relationships                             ...With Plants! 

Effects of toxic plants on livestock and pets. Eureka Gulch Clubhouse, Keller St., Republic

Saturday

March 28

11:00 AM- 12:30 PM

I'm a paragraph. Click here

Barstow Meeting

Monday 

Nov. 4

Republic Meeting

Tuesday

Nov. 5

1:00 PM -

3:00 PM

(both meetings)

to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

Ferry

Conservation

District

5 Year

Planning Introductory Meetings

Attend  one of these informational meetings to find out how the Conservation District plans for the future. Bring your conservation ideas and resource concerns and contribute to the process.  

 

Meetings will be held at the Kettle River Grange in Barstow  (just off Hwy. 395) and at the Eureka Gulch Community Clubhouse in Republic (75 N. Keller).  Refreshments will be served.